Insect Biocontrol Laboratory Rose Gall Midge Photograph Collection

Injury to Briarcliff rose by Platynota stultana. Agricultural Research Service Insect Biocontrol Laboratory Rose Gall Midge Photograph Collection. Introduction

The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Insect Biocontrol Laboratory Rose Gall Midge Photograph Collection contains approximately 100 photographs and spans the years of 1915-1976. The collection is 0.5 linear feet and occupies one box. Most of the photographs are in good condition; however, 10 folders of completely deteriorated photographs were removed from the collection. There are no restrictions on the collection at Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, Maryland.

The collection includes various sizes of black and white photographs, glass negatives, and black and white negatives. There are descriptive cards that some of the photographs are attached to that have information such as subject, office, number, locality, date, size, photographer and description of the plants and parasites used. The photographs are related to the work on the rose gall midge (Dasineura spp.) by ARS Insect Biological Control Laboratory. They cover various aspects of early pest research for various rose species from the Washington, DC area. Other divisions mentioned throughout the collection are Tropical Crops and Truck Crops, which are both part of the Agricultural Research Service.

The photographs were donated by Don Weber, Research Entomologist and Lead Scientist with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), ARS, Invasive Insect Biocontrol and Behavior Laboratory.

This collection was partially arranged and described by Amanda Nelson in 2010. Steps involved in partial arrangement and description includes surveying materials, placing materials in new folders and boxes, and writing a container list for the collection.


Disclaimer

Special Collections of the National Agricultural Library (NAL) acquires, arranges, describes, preserves and makes available rare materials significant to the history of agriculture. Materials are obtained through donation or active collection in accordance with the established Special Collections collection development policy. Special Collections staff organize and describe materials according to archival principles and create descriptions and indexes to enhance access. Staff do not edit or otherwise modify the original materials. The views expressed in the collections do not necessarily reflect the policies of the National Agricultural Library or the United States Department of Agriculture.


Organizational History

The Insect Pathology Laboratory moved from Moorestown, New Jersey to Beltsville, Maryland in 1954. Under the direction of Dr. A. M. Heipel, the scientists worked on basic research problems associated with insect viruses, insect cell culture, Bacillus thuringiensis, and other areas of insect pathology. In 1990 the Insect Pathology Laboratory became the Insect Biocontrol Laboratory. It was established to achieve greater coherence in the study of biological control. The photographs in the collection were all taken when the Insect Pathology Laboratory was in existence, but ended up as part of the Insect Biocontrol Laboratory in later years. The mission of the Insect Biocontrol Laboratory is to develop selective and environmentally compatible ways of controlling insect pests of agricultural importance. Their work results in a healthier, safer food supply and cleaner air, water, and soil. One such insect pest studied by the Insect Pathology Laboratory was the rose gall midge and its relationships with various varieties of rose plants. The photographs document some of the early research done on the rose gall midge and the damage it caused to the rose plants.


Bibliography

Beltsville Agricultural Research Center Insect Biocontrol. "History of the Insect Biocontrol Laboratory." United States Department of Agriculture. http://www.ba.ars.usda.gov/psi/ibl/ibl_about.html (accessed 8 April 2010).

Beltsville Agricultural Research Center Insect Biocontrol. "Mission statement." United States Department of Agriculture. http://www.ba.ars.usda.gov/psi/ibl/ibl_miss.html (accessed 8 April 2010).